adorable newborn baby resting on soft blue plaid in studio

John 3:1-10, Part 3

[New to our exegesis of John’s Gospel? Try starting at The Beginning — see top menu for John 1:1-2].

Now there was a Pharisee named Nicodemus, a leader of the Jews. He came to Jesus by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher who has come from God; for no one can do these signs that you do apart from the presence of God.” Jesus answered him, “Very truly, I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God without being born from above.” Nicodemus said to him, “How can anyone be born after having grown old? Can one enter a second time into the mother’s womb and be born?” Jesus answered, “Very truly, I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit. What is born of the flesh is flesh, and what is born of the Spirit is spirit. Do not be astonished that I said to you, ‘You must be born from above.’ The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.” Nicodemus said to him, “How can these things be?” 10 Jesus answered him, “Are you a teacher of Israel, and yet you do not understand these things?

Ἦν δὲ ἄνθρωπος ἐκ τῶν Φαρισαίων, Νικόδημος ὄνομα αὐτῷ, ἄρχων τῶν Ἰουδαίων· οὗτος ἦλθεν πρὸς αὐτὸν νυκτὸς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· Ῥαββί, οἴδαμεν ὅτι ἀπὸ θεοῦ ἐλήλυθας διδάσκαλος· οὐδεὶς γὰρ δύναται ταῦτα τὰ σημεῖα ποιεῖν ἃ σὺ ποιεῖς, ἐὰν μὴ ᾖ ὁ θεὸς μετ’ αὐτοῦ. ἀπεκρίθη Ἰησοῦς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· Ἀμὴν ἀμὴν λέγω σοι, ἐὰν μή τις γεννηθῇ ἄνωθεν, οὐ δύναται ἰδεῖν τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ. λέγει πρὸς αὐτὸν ὁ Νικόδημος· Πῶς δύναται ἄνθρωπος γεννηθῆναι γέρων ὤν; μὴ δύναται εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν τῆς μητρὸς αὐτοῦ δεύτερον εἰσελθεῖν καὶ γεννηθῆναι; ἀπεκρίθη Ἰησοῦς· Ἀμὴν ἀμὴν λέγω σοι, ἐὰν μή τις γεννηθῇ ἐξ ὕδατος καὶ πνεύματος, οὐ δύναται εἰσελθεῖν εἰς τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ. τὸ γεγεννημένον ἐκ τῆς σαρκὸς σάρξ ἐστιν, καὶ τὸ γεγεννημένον ἐκ τοῦ πνεύματος πνεῦμά ἐστιν. μὴ θαυμάσῃς ὅτι εἶπόν σοι Δεῖ ὑμᾶς γεννηθῆναι ἄνωθεν. τὸ πνεῦμα ὅπου θέλει πνεῖ, καὶ τὴν φωνὴν αὐτοῦ ἀκούεις, ἀλλ’ οὐκ οἶδας πόθεν ἔρχεται καὶ ποῦ ὑπάγει· οὕτως ἐστὶν πᾶς ὁ γεγεννημένος ἐκ τοῦ πνεύματος. ἀπεκρίθη Νικόδημος καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· Πῶς δύναται ταῦτα γενέσθαι; 10 ἀπεκρίθη Ἰησοῦς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· Σὺ εἶ ὁ διδάσκαλος τοῦ Ἰσραὴλ καὶ ταῦτα οὐ γινώσκεις; 

Baptism

We can’t go on without addressing Jesus’ comment that no one can enter the Kingdom of God without being born of Spirit and water. Is this a reference to baptism?

Up to this point, Nicodemus would have had some Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) understandings of what Jesus was saying (e.g. “I will put my spirit within you,” Ezek. 36:25). And the early Christian readers of John’s Gospel likely would have heard the reference to water here as relating to Christian baptism. But what about Nicodemus and this conversation taking place prior to that time? How would Nicodemus have heard this?

John the Baptist was out baptizing people, and apparently Jesus was as well (John 3:26). The Jews at that time also had a baptism for new converts to Judaism with the one baptized referred to as a new-born child. In addition, the Hebrew Scriptures have many references to the Spirit being poured out like water, and the Feast of Tabernacles has considerable liturgy and ceremony using water as a symbol of Spirit.

Some scholars believe a later redactor added the phrase and water to reflect the later practice of Christian baptism, but there is simply no textual evidence to support that, only the assumption that it would seem out of place here. However, given the considerable association Spirit and water already had in Judaism, there is no need to assume this.

Therefore, we can take this conversation at face value: Jesus says that a new birth by Spirit and water is necessary to enter the Kingdom of God. Did he mean this literally or symbolically? Literalists will argue that children not baptized who die are without salvation. Did Jesus intend this? There are tomes of arguments about this, but I personally don’t believe the literal view. Rather, water is a rich symbol in the Hebrew Scriptures, full of meaning and often associated with birthing. I believe Jesus was saying to Nicodemus: To see God, Nick, you’ve got to unlearn a lot, die in fact to self and all that religious nonsense that gets in the way, and start over like a newborn baby, only this time, the breaking of the water, is the breaking open of the Heavens and the descent of the Spirit to give you a new name, identity, and Life.

And that’s available to you, too…if you can unlearn all that clutter that keeps you from drinking from the well of God!